Flint, Michigan, Thrust Into the Third World, in Pictures

My earliest magazine subscription came as a gift from my mother when I was 13. I wasn’t the healthiest child, but in my early years I took solace in the fact that whenever I had to go to the doctor’s office in Brooklyn Heights, there were copies of National Geographic on the tables in which I could become totally absorbed.

I loved seeing the primitive jungle worlds, the stark worlds of ice, the colorful Slavic villages and challenging Himalayas. The stories depicted parts of the world where struggle and adversity were overcome by the joy of living, the sense of victory in overcoming nature’s wrath. So imagine my surprise when National Geographic took on the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, an American city thrust into third-worldly gloom without the sense of joy or triumph. Flint, a city where public servants chose to poison its residents, to save a few dollars in the wealthiest nation in the world.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, the National Geographic pictures of photographer Wayne Lawrence speak volumes. We live in a nation where such tragedies are though to be unheard of. But yet, here it is, documented on the pages of National Geographic. This is something that I never thought I would see as a child some 50 years ago. I wonder how far our nation will sink 50 years from now?

Click here for that NatGeo presentation.

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Flint, Michigan, Thrust Into the Third World, in Pictures

  1. National Geographic reading had a funny way of putting me in those places just for a moment in time as i read and look at the beautiful illustrations. Similar to the Flint tragedy, Hurricane Katrina humans trapped in the Superdome, the refuge became a hell hole, the nation and the world literally sat still watching like the twilight zone, the media coverage daily moving in slow motion. As no one did nothing. In my opinion. Flint residents need to be evacuated and the water infrastructure rebuilt. Will couple of cases of bottled water help, or is it just a bandaid. I would run for my life, property ownership or not. The integrithy of our country is going downhill at a rapid pace.

    Liked by 2 people

    • You are so right about how National Geographic has a way of calling out our national weaknesses through pictures. The effects of Katrina, like Flint, could have been avoided if more concern were given to the human consequences as opposed to the economic. Unlike New Orleans as the water receded, Flint has no path to becoming whole again any time soon. Imagine who would want to live, work or invest in a place where the basic necessity of clean, healthy water could not be guaranteed for decades to come. Many people should go to prison behind this. That would not resolve Flint’s immediate problems, but it would send a chilling message to those who might be tempted to repeat those same transgressions. The money those public servants sought to save by sending untreated river water to the populace is nothing compared to the generation of children with lead poison, the inability to sell property or the zero consideration for investments in that city. Truly, a cautionary tale! Thank you for your thoughts on this LASCOTT33!

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  2. National Geographic reading had a funny way of putting me in those places just for a moment in time as i read and look at the beautiful illustrations.

    Similar to the Flint tragedy, Hurricane Katrina humans trapped in the Superdome, the refuge became a hell hole, the nation and the world literally sat still watching like the twilight zone, the media coverage daily moving in slow motion. As no one did nothing. In my opinion. Flint residents need to be evacuated and the water infrastructure rebuilt. Will couple of cases of bottled water help, or is it just a bandaid. I would run for my life, property ownership or not. The integrithy of our country is going downhill at a rapid pace.

    Like

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